Antigone Sophocles

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Sophocles' Antigone : A New Translation (2011, Paperback)

Sophocles' Antigone : A New Translation (2011, Paperback)

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The Burial at Thebes : A Version of Sophocles' Antigone: Seamus Heaney 2004 HC

The Burial at Thebes : A Version of Sophocles' Antigone: Seamus Heaney 2004 HC

Price: 9.63 USD

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Little Blue Book 562 - Antigone, by Sophocles - copyright 1924

Little Blue Book 562 - Antigone, by Sophocles - copyright 1924

Price: 2.49 USD

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The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles & Cliffs Notes: Oedipus t King, Colonus, Antigone

The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles & Cliffs Notes: Oedipus t King, Colonus, Antigone

Price: 3.5 USD

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Sophocles, Volume II. Antigone. The Women of Trachis. Philoctetes. Oedipus at Co

Sophocles, Volume II. Antigone. The Women of Trachis. Philoctetes. Oedipus at Co

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ANTIGONE [9780195061673] - RICHARD EMIL BRAUN, ET AL. SOPHOCLES (PAPERBACK)

ANTIGONE [9780195061673] - RICHARD EMIL BRAUN, ET AL. SOPHOCLES (PAPERBACK)

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The Burial at Thebes : A Version of Sophocles' Antigone by Sophocles (2005,...

The Burial at Thebes : A Version of Sophocles' Antigone by Sophocles (2005,...

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SIGNED 1951 First Printing THE IMAGERY OF SOPHOCLES' ANTIGONE *Poetic Language

SIGNED 1951 First Printing THE IMAGERY OF SOPHOCLES' ANTIGONE *Poetic Language

Price: 49.99 USD

Time Left: 28 days, 7 hours, 1 minute and 42 seconds

Sophocles Antigone New Translation To Hebrew, 2007

Sophocles Antigone New Translation To Hebrew, 2007

Price: 7.0 USD

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Antigone Sophocles 2 LP box set TRS 320-M Caedmon w/insert Tutin/Adrian/Brett/

Antigone Sophocles 2 LP box set TRS 320-M Caedmon w/insert Tutin/Adrian/Brett/

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SOPHOCLES II - OEDIPUS THE KING, OEDIPUS AT COLONUS, ANTIGONE

SOPHOCLES II - OEDIPUS THE KING, OEDIPUS AT COLONUS, ANTIGONE

Price: 6.0 USD

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The Antigone of Sophocles - Sophocles - Acceptable - Paperback

The Antigone of Sophocles - Sophocles - Acceptable - Paperback

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King oedipus, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone  Coles Notes, Sophocles,

King oedipus, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone Coles Notes, Sophocles,

Price: 10.45 USD

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Sophocles- The Three Theban Plays: Antigone, Oedipus the King,Oedipus at Colonus

Sophocles- The Three Theban Plays: Antigone, Oedipus the King,Oedipus at Colonus

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Guide to Sophocles' Antigone: A Student Edition

Price: 62.96 USD

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Antigone (Dover Thrift Editions) by Sophocles

Antigone (Dover Thrift Editions) by Sophocles

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Antigone by Sophocles (2001, Paperback)

Antigone by Sophocles (2001, Paperback)

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Antigone by Sophocles Theatre Play in 1922 Modern Postcard

Antigone by Sophocles Theatre Play in 1922 Modern Postcard

Price: 1.47 USD

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Antigone by Sophocles (2001, Paperback)

Antigone by Sophocles (2001, Paperback)

Price: 0.99 USD

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Antigone, Oedipus the King, Electra by Sophocles (1998, UK-Paperback)

Antigone, Oedipus the King, Electra by Sophocles (1998, UK-Paperback)

Price: 4.49 USD

Time Left: 5 days, 10 hours, 18 minutes and 37 seconds

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"Antigone Sophocles" Latest News - The Guardian

Books

The Story of Antigone review – retold in style, beautifully illustrated

Ali Smith brings Sophocles's tragedy to life in an imaginative reworking for younger readers, writes Marcus Sedgwick... More »

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The Island – review

The bickering Robben Island inmates in Athol Fugard's play remind us of freedoms at stake now, writes Andrew Dickson

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"Antigone Sophocles" Most Relevant - The Guardian

Stage

Theatre review: Antigone / Tron, Glasgow

This stripped-back staging of Sophocles makes you more conscious of clever directorial choices than the drama's beating heart, says Mark Fisher.

... More »

Stage

Antigone, Walworth Council Chambers, London

Walworth Council Chambers, London

... More »

Stage

Antigone, Salts Mill, Saltaire

Salts Mill, Saltaire

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Stage

Antigone

Mermaid Arts Centre, Bray.

... More »

Culture

Antigone

Assembly Rooms
Rating: ****

... More »

"Antigone Sophocles" Yahoo Answers

Yahoo Answers User: Lingering Still

Antigone...?

1 Answer

Chosen Answer by NY Buzz

Antigone by Sophocles is a tragedy written before or in 441 BC. It is chronologically the third of the three Theban plays but was written first. Antigone, a play written by Jean Anouilh, is a tragedy inspired by Greek mythology and the play of the same name (Antigone, by Sophocles) from the fifth century B.C. In English, it is often distinguished from its antecedent by being pronounced in its original French form, approximately "Ante-GŌN." The play was first performed in Paris on February 6, 1944, not insignificantly during the Nazi occupation thereof. A comparison is sometimes drawn between the French occupation and the play, with the character of Antigone representing courageous members of the French resistance, while her uncle Créon represents the collaborators to the German occupiers, however this interpretation is somewhat simplistic, and is not hugely helpful in understanding the deeper themes of the play. Check the two Wikipedia websites listed below for additional information you might need. Good luck. Hope you get an A.

Chosen Answer by Songsmyth

Antigone, the Sophocles play written originally in the Greek language, has been translated into English by various different translators. Below are 2 distinct translations of this well-known monologue. I am unsure, by your description, if this is the material you seek. In this passage, Antigone mentions nothing about “wanting to not understand.” She does, however, at one point pose the question, “What law of God have I broken?” (Or “...what law of Heaven have I transgressed?” in the old English version.) But in this monologue, she spends most of her time decrying the injustice of her condition. If for nothing else, I hope it will be useful for you to see, side-by-side, one version in an old English style and another version in a more contemporary English. First, the contemporary English translation: Antigone: Tomb, bridal chamber, prison forever
 Dug in rock, it is to you I am going
 To join my people, that great number that have died,
 Whom in their death Persephone received.
 I am the last of them and I go down
 In the worst death of all-for I have not lived
 The due term of my life. But when I come
 To that other world my hope is strong
 That my coming will be welcome to my father,
 And dear to you, my mother, and dear to you,
 My brother deeply loved. For when you died,
 With my own hands I washed and dressed you all,
 And poured the lustral offerings on your graves.
 And now, Polynice, it was for such care of your body
 That I have earned these wages.
 Yet those who think rightly will think I did right
 In honoring you. Had I been a mother
 Of children, and my husband been dead and rotten,
 I would not have taken this weary task upon me
 Against the will of the city. What law backs me when I say this? I will tell you:
If my husband were dead, I might have had another,
 And child from another man, if I lost the first.
 But when father and mother both were hidden in death
 No brother's life would bloom for me again.
 That is law under which I gave you precedence,
 My dearest brother, and that is why Creon thinks me
 Wrong, even a criminal, and now takes me
 By the hand and leads me away, Unbedded, without bridal, without share In marriage and in nurturing children;
 As lonely as you see me, without friends;
 With fate against me I go into the vault of death While still alive. What law of God have I broken?
 Why should I still look to the gods in misery? Whom should I summon as an ally? For indeed Because of piety I was called impious.
 If this proceeding is good in the god's eyes,
 I shall know my sin, once I have suffered.
 But if Creon and his people are the wrongdoers
 Let their suffering be no worse than the injustice
 They are meting out to me. (Here is another English translation of the same monologue – in case you prefer it to the one above.) ANTIGONE: Tomb, bridal chamber, eternal prison in the caverned rock, whither I go to find mine own, those many who have perished, and whom Persephone hath received among the dead! Last of all shall I pass thither, and far most miserably of all, before the term of my life is spent. But I cherish good hope that my coming will be welcome to my father, and pleasant to thee, my mother, and welcome, brother, to thee; for, when you died, with mine own hands I washed and dressed you, and poured drink-offerings at your graves; and now, Plyneices, 'tis for tending thy corpse that I win such recompense as this. And yet I honoured thee, as the wise will deem, rightly. Never had I been a mother of children, or if a husband had been mouldering in death, would I have taken this task upon me in the city's despite. What law, ye ask, is my warrant for that word? The husband lost, another might have been found, and child from another, to replace the first-born; but, father and mother hidden with Hades, no brother's life could ever bloom for me again. Such was the law whereby I held thee first in honour; but Creon deemed me guilty of error therein, and of outrage, ah brother mine! And now he leads me thus, a captive in his hands; no bridal bed, no bridal song hath been mine, no joy of marriage, no portion in the nurture of children; but thus, forlorn of friends, unhappy one, I go living to the vaults of death. And what law of Heaven have I transgressed? Why, hapless one, should I look to the gods any more--what ally should I invoke--when by piety I have earned the name of impious? Nay, then, if these things are pleasing to the gods, when I have suffered my doom, I shall come to know my sin; but if the sin is with my judges, I could wish them no fuller measue of evil than they, on their part, mete wrongfully to me. *** Side note: The French dramatist, Jean Anouilh (pronounced, very roughly: ‘jzon on-weel’), also wrote a play called Antigone, based on the Sophocles play. I cannot locate material from Anouilh’s play, but here is reference material on the author: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antigone_%28Anouilh_play%29 http://www.bookrags.com/biography/jean-anouilh/

Chosen Answer by aida

To what extent is Antigone a tragic hero (heroine)? (You'll need to know Aristotle's definition to answer this satisfactorily.) Then who in the play IS? How does that character fit the requirements? In the Prologue, Antigone tells Ismene that anyone who disobeys the order against burying Polyneices will be stoned to death by the people, but when she is caught, Creon orders her to be enclosed in a tomb. Why do you think he makes this change? (How supportive has the chorus, which represents "the people," been of his decree? What's the first thing Creon says to Antigone when the sentry brings her in and says she was caught burying the body?) How would you describe or characterize the sentry? How do you envision him coming to the palace, as he recounts it himself at his first entrance? (Is he acting it out as he describes it?) Why do Antigone and Haemon never appear together? (There may be many reasons why Sophocles chose not to show them interacting with each other, but as the play stands, they're also evidently played by the same actor.) What seems to be Creon's real reason for not backing down, and what finally enables him to do so? On what grounds does he refuse to listen to Haemon? What do you think happened afterward? (At the end of the play, Creon's only living relative is Ismene, and it's easy to imagine that she was quickly courted by some fortune-hunter eager to assert his wife's right to be Queen of Thebes.)

Chosen Answer by Missy Diva

Antigone is Oedipus's ultimate accomplishment. She is the one who restored her family's reputation and rekindled the fading glory of Oedipus that once shone over all the people in Thebes. She possesses the characteristics of her father: decisiveness, courage, pride, and a sense of righteousness, and through these traits she manages to recapture the respect and support of the masses, just like Oedipus once did, through her achievements. "The daughter is as headstrong as the father. Submission is a thing she's never learned," remarks the Leader of the Chorus. We see similarities between Antigone and her late father, Oedipus, in Sophocle's Antigone. She and her father both struggle to do what is right, while knowing in advance that they are doomed. Perhaps it is because Antigone spent her entire early life at Oedipus's side and picked up his traits, or maybe she just inherited them, or maybe both. Nevertheless, no matter how or when she attained these characteristics, it is undeniable that at the time of her death, she possessed them to as equal a degree as her father. She faced death boldly, in order to stand up for herself and what she believed in. Oedipus's trust in the gods' advice led to his death, when he willingly sacrificed himself in order to help his friend Theseus. Antigone sacrificed herself too, in order to provide a proper burial for her brother, even though her brother had not done many things to earn such kindness. Still, she does, because she believes it is the right thing to do. Attempts made to change her mind fail, because she knows that it is the Heaven's law, and that it takes precedence over all laws made by mortals on Earth. "Please your fantasy and call it wicked, what the gods call good," she says to her sister Ismene, who desperately tries to protest. Antigone's confidence is unfailing; she is sure that there is no way that she could be doing wrong. This is another trait of Oedipus. Some call it arrogance, but I say self-righteousness. Oedipus never succumbed to sweet talk, fear, or selfishness. Even though he could have lived a much more comfortable life when Creon offered him a chance to return to Thebes, he turned it down because he knew it was a manipulative move and in the end, possessing no virtue. When he was offered a chance to make amends with his son, he rejected it because he saw his son was worthless and pathetic. Antigone thinks similarly. When she was told by Creon that her sentence was death for the illegal burial of her brother, she smugly responded, "I need no trumpeter from you to tell me I must die, we all die anyway. And if this hurries me to death before my time, why, such death is a gain. Yes, surely gain to one whom life so overwhelms." What courage: boldness even in the face of great danger. She taunts her uncle's authority when she speaks of higher powers that will recognize what she has done for the dead and reward her. Such faith in one's own actions is rarely heard of. It can only be the influence of Oedipus, who also believes himself to be infallible at heart

Chosen Answer by londonlubber

Antigone is considered a tragedy because it is an extension of the tragedy of Oedipus Rex. Oedipus is the father of Antigone, and he married his mother. Basically, Antigone's grandmother is also her mother. When Oedipus was born, it was prophesied that he would kill his father and marry his mother. Fearing their son's fate, the parents sent him to a neighboring kingdom and forgot about him. Oedipus grew up, and was riding in the woods. He encountered some men, and got into a fight with one of the men. It came to blows, and he eventually killed the man. It was his father, who was journeying. He went to Thebes, the kingdom of his birth, saved the town from the sphinx, and fell in love with his mother, and then married her. They had four children, two sons, Polynices and Eteocles, and two daughters, Antigone and Ismene. Tragedy strikes Thebes, and the people demand to know who the murderer of the former king was. Oedipus researches and finds that he is adopted, and that he is the murderer. When his wife/mother finds out, she commits suicide, and Oedipus gouges out his own eyes. He takes Antigone with him to beg in the streets, and Antigone is later killed for insisting on the burial of one of her shamed brothers.

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